Don’t glue Polyethylene, BOND Polyethylene

Glue Polyethylene?  No, “bond” Polyethylene – with our patented Polymer Bonding Process (Process)

If you had asked Google “How to glue polyethylene?”, we often come up as the result. This is as a result of our patented Bonding Poly Process. We paved the way in the Poly bonding arena and were the first with bond polyethylene, bond nylon, bond Teflon and bond silicone pages etc. etc. Through our extensive experience of over 20 years, we were able to develop the tools and steps necessary to achieve amazing results, even with the most difficult low surface energy materials.

‘Gluing polyethylene’ with the Bonding Poly Process ® only takes four simple steps. The Process bonds Polyethylene quickly, easily and permanently. It takes the place of the need to weld altogether, but works on a similar principle. Welding melts the two plastics together and the molecular process we utilize conjoins the two surfaces together, on a molecular level. The result is a bond that is often stronger than the material itself. Unlike glues or epoxy’s that work purely on a superficial level by being “sticky”, our molecular bonding process takes place beneath the surface. What the Process is, is the cohesion of the monomers and polymers of each material, whether they are similar or dissimilar. In regards to plastics, this process is called polymerization. One of the reasons our bonding process is so effective on poly’s, is that our system of bonding them, is similar to the system used to create them. Our Bonding Poly Process is a quick, easy and effective way to permanently interlace two surfaces together on a molecular level.

Note: The picture at the top shows a polyethylene plate with steel square, an aluminum square, a Teflon block, silicone rubber and HDPE pipe all bonded. Average tensile strength for each of the bonds is in the range of 2000 psi. Importantly, because the pieces are bonded, not glued. to the plate, they will not degrade and fall off.

The Process bonds any polymer to itself, to any other polymer and/or to any other substrate. This includes all types of polyethylene; low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and high density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE in particular used to be a challenge due to its high abrasion resistance. Its slick, hard surface makes it all but impossible for glues or epoxy’s, that work by being ‘sticky’, to stick. It is like trying to glue water and why conventional wisdom is that you cannot glue polymers. Sticking two items together on a superficial level by being sticky, only works on certain materials and polymers are not one of them. This is especially true for HDPE with its abrasion resistance and LDPE with its low surface energy. These unique material difficulties, along with years of trial and error, are what led us to the end all solution for all poly’s and difficult substrates; the Bonding Poly Process.

Properties.

Materials with high surface energy have attractive forces and they are easy to bond or even ‘glue’. Materials with low surface energy like polyethylene, have inherently repulsive forces, which make it virtually impenetrable and therefore impossible to ‘glue’. The chemistry and physics behind the process, are what ensure its success. Since the finalization of the Process in 2016, there has not been a reported bond failure. Wherever and whenever we state that we can bond polyethylene or any other poly the universal reaction is skepticism.  Skeptics are the reason why we have a 100% customer satisfaction money-back guarantee.  If any of our kits do not perform to your expectations, we will refund your purchase price.  Simply return the kit.  After selling thousands of kits, we have only made one refund. 

Below is a video showing the steps in the Polymer Bonding Process.  We are working on a new “Don’t glue polyethylene, bond polyethylene” video,  As soon as the video is complete we will post the polyethylene video.

Note:  The Process will not permanently bond glass, stainless or alloy steels.

Poly Kits

With each Poly Kit you will receive:

  • An SI Structural Adhesive
  • Our standard Activator/Accelerator
  • The Poly Prep
*Our Surface Insensitive (SI) Structural Adhesives, in conjunction with our Poly Prep Adhesion Promoter, will bond 98% of all materials.

To bond polyethylene to itself or to any other polymer

When work time is NOT required.

  1. Rough the polyethylene (poly) surface(s) with either steel wool or sandpaper.
  2. Clean the surface with a cleaner that will not leave a residue.  Thoroughly wipe with a soft cloth.
  3. Saturate both polyethylene (poly) surfaces with the Poly Prep. an adhesion promoter for polymers.
  4. Spray a light mist of our Activator/Accelerator (AA) on one of the polyethylene surfaces.
  5. Warm both polyethylene (poly) surfaces with a hair dryer or heat gun.  Very warm, but not hot.  By temperature, approximately 120 degrees F.
  6. Apply an SI Structural Adhesive to the opposite polyethylene (poly) surface (from where you sprayed the AA).
  7. Align the surfaces and firmly press together for 10-15 seconds.

When work time is needed.

  1. Rough the polyethylene (poly) surface(s) with a either steel wool or sandpaper.
  2. Clean the surface(s) with a cleaner that will not leave a residue.  Thoroughly wipe with a soft cloth.
  3. Saturate both polyethylene (poly) surfaces with the Poly Prep. which is an adhesion promoter for polymers.
  4. Warm both polyethylene (poly) surfaces with a hair dryer or heat gun till the surfaces are very warm, but not hot.
    1. By temperature, approximately 120 degrees F.
    2. By touch, just below hot.
  5. Apply an SI Structural Adhesive using continuous circles to one of the polyethylene (poly) surfaces.
    1. When applying, make sure that the SI adhesive reaches the edges.
    2. Make sure the adhesive is in an unbroken line.  The chemical reaction started in step 7 will travel along the adhesive line.
  6. Align the surfaces, firmly press the two surfaces together for 6 – 8 seconds.
  7. Spray the seam with the Activator/Accelerator.  As stated, the chemical reaction will travel, following the adhesive line.

As a result of this process, the two polyethylene (poly) surfaces will be bonded together.  Operational strength is almost immediate, but the strength of the bond is directly proportional to the amount of time it is given to fully cure.

.

To bond polyethylene to steel or any other metal.

Please note, the Process will not permanently bond stainless or alloy steels.

  1. Rough the polyethylene surfaces with low grit sand paper.
  2. Sand the aluminum to a polished surface.  Prepare the steel to a near white finish.  In both cases, start the surface preparation with a coarse grit paper and finish with a 400 or 600 grit paper.
  3. Clean all surfaces with a cleaner that will not leave a residue.  Wipe with a clean soft cloth.
  4. Saturate the polyethylene with our Poly Prep, an adhesion promoter for polymers and poly-plastics.
  5. Spray a solvent based Activator/Accelerator (AA) on the polyethylene surface or the metal.
  6. Warm the polyethylene surface with a hair dryer or heat gun.  Warm to very warm, but not hot.
    1. By touch, just below hot.
    2. By temperature, about 120 degrees F.
  7. Apply an SI cyanoacrylate to the opposite surface from where AA was sprayed.
  8. Firmly press the two surfaces together for fifteen to twenty seconds.

In conclusion, the polyethylene and metal surfaces will be bonded together.  Operational strength is almost immediate, but the strength of the bond is directly proportional to the amount of time it is given to fully cure. If work time is needed use the procedure described above.

The Alternative for Manufacturers when Bonding Polyethylene: BP Blue

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BP Blue is a structural adhesive that will work with many thermoplastic or thermoset polymers.  BP Blue is not recommended for elastomers, or for cross bonding different polymers to each other or a polymer to a non-poly substrate. Though BP Blue can be used by itself, we strongly recommend the use of our standard Activator/Accelerator (AA) when bonded polyethylene. BP Blue will also bond other thermoplastic polymers, including; polypropylene, polyurethane, HDPE, Teflon®, Delrin®, UHMW’s, , nylon, etc., to themselves or to other long string polymers.  BP Blue is not recommended for bonding elastomers or for cross-bonding a thermoplastic to other substrates.  BP Blue withstands the extremes of weather and, in most cases, these bonds will not degrade over time. BP Blue dries clear, and testing shows that bonds made with BP Blue will actually increase in strength for at least thirty days.

Save 15% With Tech-Bond Kits

Any of our Poly, Deluxe, or Professional Kits will bond Polyethylene to itself and any other substrate; except stainless steel and glass.

*If you have any questions, feel free to call 877-565-7225.

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Poly Molecular Bonding Kit- For Polyethylene
Average rating:  
 1 reviews
byJames Logan onPoly Molecular Bonding Kit- For Polyethylene
Best bond of polyethylene I've seen

I needed to fix a polyethylene barrel. Nothing I tried would even stick to it. I tried caulk, superglue, silicon, epoxy, water weld. Nothing except this tech bond worked. Do yourself a favor and try this first.

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